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Physics Colloquium: “Quantum Control of Spins in Silicon”

April 13 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Mark Eriksson

University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Physics

Abstract: Quantum computing is based on the manipulation of two-level quantum systems, or qubits. In most approaches to quantum computing, qubits are as much as possible isolated from their environment in order to minimize the loss of qubit phase coherence. The use of nuclear spins as qubits is a well-known realization of this approach. In a radically different approach, quantum computing is also possible for strongly coupled multi-electron spin 1/2 systems, as realized in silicon-based devices. In this talk I will present both a historical overview of how quantum manipulation in silicon has developed, as well as the latest results from both our group at Wisconsin and from around the world.  I will discuss our recent demonstration of coherent manipulation of eight different microwave-frequency resonances in a single silicon quantum dot, which starts to glimpse the future prospect of spin qubits being controlled using the types of powerful tools developed for controlling atoms by the AMO community over many decades.  I will end with a brief discussion of how silicon fits into the broad quantum science and technology ecosystem, which is growing at an astounding rate. This article in Physics Today discusses closely related material: Quantum computing with semiconductor spins.

All lectures are via Zoom: https://mines.zoom.us/j/98686472990?pwd=REFBbFBJZk9MbXhldGRzemNaczlTZz09

Bio: Mark A. Eriksson is the John Bardeen Professor of Physics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  He received a B.S. with honors in physics and mathematics in 1992 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and an A.M. (1994) and Ph.D. (1997) in physics from Harvard University.  His Ph.D. thesis demonstrated the first cryogenic scanned-gate measurements of a semiconductor nanostructure.  He was a postdoctoral member of technical staff at Bell Laboratories from 1997-1999, where he studied ultra-low-density electron systems.  Eriksson joined the faculty of the Department of Physics at UW-Madison in 1999.  His research has focused on quantum computing, semiconductor quantum dots, and nanoscience.  With collaborators he demonstrated the first quantum dot in silicon/silicon-germanium occupied by an individual electron and performed the first experiments to demonstrate the quantum dot hybrid qubit.  Eriksson currently leads a multi-university team focused on the development of spin qubits in gate-defined silicon quantum dots. A goal of this work is to enable quantum computers, which manipulate information coherently, to be built using many of the materials and fabrication methods that are the foundation of modern, classical integrated circuits.  Eriksson was elected fellow of the American Physical Society in 2012 and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2015.

Details

Date:
April 13
Time:
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
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Website:
https://physics.mines.edu/colloquia/

Venue

CO United States + Google Map